Program

VISIONARY LEARNING

The two and a half day program will give you thought-provoking insight on emergent themes in the project leadership community.

Featuring 35 professional development sessions, from high-level keynote sessions through to explorative concurrent sessions and professional workshops, the choice is endless and allows you to tailor your conference experience to your specific needs.


Sunday 20 October, 2019

12.00pm Registration opens  
1.00pm - 3.00pm

Community of Practice - Local Government

More details coming soon

Community of Practice - Project Management Office survival

More details coming soon

3.30pm - 5.30pm

Workshop 1 - 

Leading multi-functional teams in a digital world 

More details coming soon

Workshop 2 - 

The Power of Authenticity - The Importance of Empathy and Vulnerability in Leadership 

More details coming soon

6.00pm - 8.00pm Welcome Reception - Level 28 Skybar Lounge, Crown Metropol  


Monday 21 October, 2019

7.00am Registration opens
8.30am - 5.45pm Conference sessions
5.45pm - 6.45pm Happy Hour - Exhibition area, Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre


Tuesday 22 October, 2019

7.30am Registration opens
8.30am - 5.15pm Conference sessions
7.00pm - 11.00pm National Project Management Achievement Awards Dinner - Crown Palladium

* Program is subject to change

 

KEYNOTE VISIONS

Each of the keynote sessions will explore high-level concepts through the delivery of powerful and inspiring presentations.

From old ways of working to new ways of leading

Speakers: Peter Moutsatsos and Rob Loader, Telstra

What today’s enterprise agile transformations can teach us about the skills needed to lead projects over the next decade

In just a matter of months, we will be dawning on the 2020s. 20 years ago, project management was more defined as process and software than as a profession. The vast majority of PMs were accidental. It was exclusively more recognised and accepted as a role in construction, with green shoots in IT.  

Project managers were exposed to range of leadership styles, from ‘command-and-control’ to ‘empower-and-track’, but often expected to operate more as administrators than leaders themselves. Today, these things are seen by some companies as ‘old ways of working’.  Disruption from start-ups, both domestically and internationally, online businesses taking market share, changing consumer preferences, the emerging influence of Millennials and Generation Z, and the explosion of the gig economy has forced many companies to re-think their business models and what a leader of tomorrow will need to be successful. Project Managers are not immune. 

Many high-tech companies are embracing New Ways of Working as they recognise survival requires their teams to work with greater agility, adaptability and resilience. However, with New Ways of Working comes New Ways of Leading and this impacts on the traditional way of leading for a project manager.  

The next decade will see a new generation of People Leaders and Project Managers who embrace New Ways of Leading. Those that do so most effectively will be the winners in a global war for talent, and will be key contributors to their organisations growth.


The great debate - Is waterfall dead in the water?

There is plenty of discussion in the project world that focuses on the debate between agile and waterfall or more traditional project management approaches. We hear commentary like “agile is only hype, it will pass”, or “we’ve been doing this for many years”, or “this is only useful for IT”. Yet on the flip side, the growing agile community believes that “we don’t need project management”, or “project management is only about command and control” or “project management is not relevant to agile”.

Our two teams will go head to head and weigh in on the much-discussed topic. Is one better than the other, is it really one or the other; or can they both exist together harmoniously? At the conclusion of the debate, you as the audience will get the chance to decide!


Tales from the project playing field

Traditionally in the project management profession, as like other technically-based professions, the achievements of successful projects and their leaders is often celebrated. However rarely have they shared their learnings when projects go astray.

While most organisations undertake feedback sessions, this is primarily done internally with immediate stakeholders only. A mark of a true professional is to learn from mistakes and, where constructive, share these insights to the advantage of future projects.

Our panellists will reveal their own experiences from the project playing field, sharing what went wrong, what they learnt and how this influenced their next project.
This session will be held under Chatham House Rule and closed to any media.